Car Spotting: Winter 2020/2021 Edition

Just because a global pandemic has shut down almost all our car hobby-related group activities doesn’t mean that car owners aren’t taking their prized possessions out for solo spins. Shutdown or not, while many of us (your humble author included) salt away the collector machines every winter, there are many others who continue to pilot their cars during the colder months, as long as the roads are dry and the skies are clear.

Below are snaps of a few of the older vehicles I’ve spotted out and about these last few months, at least before the Northeast snows descended upon us. One car was spotted in a hardware store parking lot; another was dropping off an offspring at a sporting event; and a few were seen in the relatively balmy climate of Cape May NJ. In all cases, the vehicles were either moving under their own power or were legally parked, with license plates attached – these were not project-cars-in-waiting.

1965 MERCURY COMET

This 2-door hardtop was in the parking lot of my local Home Depot on a Sunday afternoon. While far from a show car (note the heavily worn paint on hood and roof), it’s obviously owned by an enthusiast, based on the wheels and the license plate. I trust that his planned hardware purchase will fit in the trunk or back seat. This is what you drive to the store when the ’49 woodie wagon is in the shop.

1965 Mercury Comet

‘60s VW KARMANN GHIA

An end-of-year visit to Cape May rewarded me with a VW two-fer. This Karmann Ghia was parked downtown and gave the impression that it had recently been driven. While the paint was dull and the bumpers were rusty, there were no body issues from corrosion or collision, and with bumper overriders, wheel covers, lights, mirror, and antenna all accounted for, this Ghia was reasonably complete! Make special note of the undented NOSE. It fit the casual funky vibe of Cape May perfectly.

VW Karmann Ghia

‘60s VW BUG

A few miles away from downtown Cape May is a United States Coast Guard Receiving Station, complete with barracks. Parked in front of one of the housing units was this Bug, with Texas plates if I recall correctly. The driver’s side running board was missing, and the bumpers didn’t look original, but like the Ghia, it looked like you could hop in it and take it for a day-long ride if you so desired. Was it driven up from Texas? I for one would not wager that it didn’t make its way up here in that manner.

VW Beetle

1966 FORD MUSTANG

This Mustang was parked at my local gas station. The paint looked recent, and aside from what appear to be incorrect wheel covers, it looked bone stock. Maybe it had been dropped off for some service work. I think that these first-generation hardtops have aged well, and compared to the more expensive Mustang convertibles and fastbacks, continue to be affordable collector cars that make for an ideal way to enter the hobby.

1966 Ford Mustang

‘70s VW TRANSPORTER

I’m no VW expert, but I believe that this vehicle is a 2nd-generation Transporter (T2), produced from 1968 to 1979 (and if I’m wrong, the Vee-Dub air-cooled authorities will be sure to respond). I spotted this “bus” in the parking lot of a local playing field, as a parent was dropping off a child for sports practice. What a cool way to get shuttled to soccer! This one must be a camper; note the pop-up roof and the duct vent just aft of the driver’s door. It’s also wearing the ultimate VW bus accessory, a peace sign decal.

VW Transporter T2

Three of the five vehicles I spotted were air-cooled Volkswagens. Are these cars, which lack liquid cooling systems, the ultimate winter collector car because they can’t freeze? What if you need heat inside? They’re notorious for lacking good interior heating systems (my dad’s ’57 Bug had no heater installed, and he kept blankets inside it for passengers). Perhaps it’s coincidence to see three of the same make, but it’s still a treat to stumble across the occasional old car on the road, especially in a season that has been devoid of normal car shows.

All photographs copyright © 2021 Richard A. Reina. Photos may not be copied or reproduced without express written permission.

4 thoughts on “Car Spotting: Winter 2020/2021 Edition

  1. That ’65 Comet coupe has to be among the few still on the road. Nice stance and cool paint patina. Likewise, seeing a rough-but-running older KG is not an everyday occurrence. From the visible exterior appearance, it seems to be a solid candidate for a restoration, refurbishment or resto-mod, depending on one’s taste and budget. Whatever the future holds for it, I hope those wide whitewalls are not part of it.

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    • Hi Bob, I knew the KG would get your attention! Personally, I’d drive it and maintain it for as long as possible without dumping a lot of money into it. Wide whites went out around ’59 I guess; how ’bout a set of raised white letter tires on there? 😉 Best, Richard

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