A Late Winter Visit To the AACA Museum

A 1958 Chevrolet Impala “on Route 66” inside the AACA Museum

 

On March 18, 2017, seven intrepid souls, expecting a delightful early spring day, ventured instead into the dreary dampness to visit the AACA (Antique Automobile Club of America) Museum in Hershey PA.

One of our rides for the day

The trip was planned weeks ago as a “rain or shine” event, and our travels were assuaged by riding in modern chariots, that is, two brand new Volvo XC90 SUVs. After an obligatory Dunkin’ Donuts stop, we were at the Museum by 11 a.m. Once there, Museum employees informed us that the basement had been emptied of many of its cars in preparation for an afternoon private event, so the daily admission fee was discounted. (AACA members are granted free entry.) But with the main floor fully stocked, there was plenty to see.

Hybrids are allowed to park up front, and recharge for free at the same time

In addition to the permanent exhibits, two temporary exhibits were in the house. “Amore della Strade” features cars and motorcycles of Italian heritage, and “Mopar Midsize Muscle” delivers big block excitement from the Chrysler Corporation.

A 1967 Plymouth GTX

Certainly, the most extraordinary permanent display is the “Cammack Collection”, a grand showing of Tucker automobiles, engines, artifacts, and history. The late David Cammack had begun collecting all things Tucker in the early 1970s. Before his passing in 2013, he willed his entire collection to the AACA Museum. The Museum in turn has done a marvelous job in setting up an interactive display to teach the public about this enigmatic automobile.

A Tucker in front of a reproduction Tucker dealership

Three hours or so after entering, we were on our way out. More importantly, we were hungry, and our stop at The Manor Restaurant & Bar up the street (thanks, Ted!) satisfied everyone’s hunger and thirst. To cap off a wonderful day, in spite of the cold, we made it (almost) all the way back without hitting any of the promised rain and snow. We each declared the day a success, and promised to make return visits.

 

Some of the oldest cars on display; the vehicles are arranged by decade

 

A 1932 Studebaker

 

The Italian motorcycles were in their own display room

 

Several of our group stand near the author’s ’67 Alfa, on loan as part of the Italian car display

 

The Tucker exhibit includes prototype engines against a photo of the engine manufacturing plant

 

Colleagues pose next to one of three Tuckers in the museum (out of 51 built)

 

 

First- and second-generation Dodge Chargers

 

1970 Dodge Charger

 

The basement includes buses and a reproduction 1950’s diner

 

A mid-60s Corvette is the centerpiece display of numerous Chevrolets

 

A wall mural pays tribute to Milton Hershey, whose businesses still dominate his namesake town

 

All photographs copyright © 2017 Richard A. Reina. Photos may not be copied or reproduced without express written permission.

6 thoughts on “A Late Winter Visit To the AACA Museum

  1. Rich Sorry I missed it. It looked like a good day. Next time I should be there See you soon Rich S

    On Sun, Mar 19, 2017 at 2:11 PM, richardscarblog wrote:

    > RichardReina posted: ” On March 18, 2017, seven intrepid souls, > expecting a delightful early spring day, ventured instead into the dreary > dampness to visit the AACA (Antique Automobile Club of America) Museum in > Hershey PA. The trip was planned weeks ago as” >

    Like

  2. Richard,
    Thank you for a very enjoyable day. I truly enjoyed your company and all the automotive information you shared throughout the day.
    Jim Puleio

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    • Hi Jim,
      Thanks for joining us! It was great to meet you. Please feel free to sign up for blog post notifications. Also, be sure to bug your brother Sal so that you get invited to join us for the Sunday drives.
      Richard

      Like

  3. Hi Richard,
    My 1939 Citroen B11 Commerciale is now ready for the road. If you promise not to drive too fast I would like to join you for some Sunday drives.

    Like

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