The Neshanic Station Car Show, June 12, 2021

The monthly Neshanic Station Car Show and Flea Market held its June event on Saturday, June 12, 2021. While vehicular attendance was perhaps a little lighter than previous shows this year, there still was a respectable number cars, perhaps several dozen, on what was a cool, cloudy, but dry day. (I have also just discovered that as per its website, there will be two shows during the months of June, July, and August.)

As always, this is a “run what you brung” kind of show, so anything of interest, be it older, newer, original, modified, etc., is welcome. The flea market seemed better supported with vendors compared to earlier this year, and plenty of spectators were there to wander the grassy field. Attendance for all is free, with a requested donation of food or cash for a local food bank, always a worthy cause.

On a personal note, I was thrilled to be able to drive and show my 1967 Alfa Romeo to this show, its first public appearance since June of 2019. Much of the past two years was spent completely rebuilding its brakes, then completely rebuilding its carburetors. While the car had made several very short outings near home, this was the farthest I had ventured in it (a whopping 3 miles) since completing the multiple overhauls. The Alfa felt strong under both accelerator and brake pedals, so I did something right!

A few cars were ones I had seen earlier this year, but most were new to me, which is a big part of the fun. Drivers felt free to come and go as they pleased, so I missed photographing some of the earliest departures, but did just manage to capture Jessie and her Saturn (more about that below). The Neshanic Station Car Show has turned into one of my personal favorites, admittedly in part due to its proximity, but also for its variety. I’m looking forward to making an appearance, with or without a car, for as many of the remaining monthly shows this year as my calendar allows.

Jessie and her Saturn

She was a late arrival, driving onto the field around 10 a.m. or so (when I had been there since before 8 a.m.). I’ll be the first to admit that my prejudices were in full bloom as I watched this white wagon approach, saying to myself “who thinks that an old Saturn station wagon is collectible, or the least bit interesting to anyone else??” Then, as she ambled by me at 3MPH and I peeked inside, I saw the first item of interest: the driver was on the right side of the car. This was a RHD Saturn, likely an old mail delivery vehicle.

She parked, and almost as if she does this every week, the young driver went about her routine, first removing an easel, then a large picture board she placed on the easel, then some other mail-related paraphernalia at the rear. I approached her and asked her name; “Jesse” she replied. In short order, she told me that the picture board was a reprint of an article from the Hagerty magazine, featuring her and her 17(!?!) Saturns. “You own 17 Saturns?” I asked somewhat incredulously. “Yes”, she said, noting that she had 2.5 acres of room in nearby Millstone for her collection.

It took only a few minutes for me to get it. She is a young, enthusiastic, car collector, and in that sense, she’s no different than I am, or many of my friends. The only difference is she collects Saturns, and mind you, only the “S” series cars, built in Spring Hill TN. No “L” series cars built in Delaware, or heaven forbid, those rebadged Opels sold by Saturn dealers near the end of the make’s run. She knows what she likes, and that’s what she sticks with, which actually puts her a step or two ahead of some collector buddies who can’t seem to decide on a theme for their own collections.

I wished Jessie good luck, which I don’t think she needs from me, and walked back to my car, further realizing that I do know several other people, male and female, who are in the 20s, crazy about cars, but who tend to like vehicles not in my own field of interest. Does that make her (or them) any different from the way I was in my 20s, or the way the rodders of the 1950s were? Not at all; the good news is, there is room in this hobby for all of us, even those who collect Saturns.

All photographs copyright © 2021 Richard A. Reina. Photos may not be copied or reproduced without express written permission.