AACA Hershey Meet, October 2010

Continuing with my coverage of Hershey visits which preceded the birth of the blog, below are a few shots from AACA Hershey 2010. The photos show that the weather was beautiful and the turnout was significant. As I stated in the blog post for the 2009 event, my photographic coverage was not as all-encompassing yet.

Photos of cars with lot numbers on the windshields were there to be auctioned by RM at the Hershey Lodge. While I was not yet in the habit of notating auction sales results, my access to the RM Sotheby’s website has allowed me to search for and find the sale prices, which are indicated below. Since the website shows numbers “all in” with commission, I have calculated the actual hammer price by backing out the 10% buyer’s premium. It would be three more years before the Isetta was trailered to RM Hershey to be sold, which occurred in 2013.

The remainder of the shots cover the big Saturday judged event. My friend Pete showed up with “his” Alfa GT 1300 Junior, which he placed in the HPOF category. The expression on my face as I stood next to the car says it all: “Pete, someday, this will be mine!” It took him a while to come around, but the day did come, in March 2013.

 

THE RM HERSHEY AUCTION

1962 Fiat 1200 Cabriolet, sold for $33,000 (hammer price $30,000)

 

1970 Fiat 500L, sold for $15,400 (hammer price $14,000)

 

1955 Studebaker Speedster, sold for $55,000 (hammer price $50,000)

 

1966 Oldsmobile Toronado, sold for $45,100 (hammer price $41,000)

 

THE SATURDAY CAR SHOW

The morning parade of cars on their way to the show field:

 

Show highlights:

C2 Corvettes

 

Jaguar XK-120

 

A British sports car lineup

 

Additional sports machines

 

Not mine yet….

 

All photographs copyright © 2022 Richard A. Reina. Photos may not be copied or reproduced without express written permission.

 

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “AACA Hershey Meet, October 2010

  1. Even though there is way too much chrome on it, that Studebaker is a great piece of auto design, looking like nothing else from the U.S. at that time. Even though it lacked outstanding driving dynamics, it sure looked sporty and fast. Speaking of sporty, if GM had made a light 4/5 scale version of the Toronado, it would have embarrassed the contemporary Mustang.
    And a rare Merkur sighting…..

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    • Hi Bob, thanks for the comments. What always struck me about those Stude coupes was how much lower they were compared to every other American vehicle of the time except the Corvette. I look at it today and I’m struck by the engineering feat, and then further struck when I remember that the company failed anyway. RE: the Toronado, despite its bulk, contemporaneous car magazine road test reviews praised its handling and driving poise, helped no doubt by its FWD platform. Best, Richard

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