NJ Region AACA Meet, May 3, 2015

The New Jersey Region of the AACA (Antique Automobile Club of America) held its 64th annual Spring Meet on Sunday, May 3, 2015, in Florham Park NJ. The location was the immense parking lot of the Automatic Switch Company, the same spot it’s been for the past 50 years. We had tremendous spring weather for a car show: temps in the low 80s, with lots of sunshine and low humidity.

Vehicle registration into the show is not limited to club members; the general public is invited, and they do turn out in force. While adherence to AACA rules (25-years-old and older vehicles in “stock” condition) is encouraged, there is a special custom class, and no one turns away vehicles that have mild modifications. This approach helps bring in the traffic, both vehicular and pedestrian.

Flea market vendors lined the perimeter of the show field.
Flea market vendors lined the perimeter of the show field.

In addition to the judged field, the NJ Region has a car corral, flea market, and food vendors on site. While small compared to Hershey (what am I saying? We could fill this lot with vendors and it would be small compared to Hershey), it provides some variety and encourages show-goers to mingle for the day.

The food truck was run by Mary, Queen of Pork. Her chicken was good too.
The food truck was run by Mary, Queen of Pork. Her chicken was good too.

This blog entry will focus on the photos, and you’ll see the very broad range of cars on display: pre-war and post-war, domestic and import, trailer queens and daily drivers. Remember that clicking on the photos will enlarge them.

The meet committee members were efficient as usual; judging was completed shortly after lunch, trophy award presentations commenced before 2pm, and we were packed up and outta there by 3pm. Car show season has officially begun!

1968 Ford Mustang convertible.
1968 Ford Mustang convertible.
1969 Alfa Romeo 1750 Spider.
1969 Alfa Romeo 1750 Spider.
The front trunk ("frunk") on a 2nd generation Chevrolet Corvair.
The front trunk (“frunk”) on a 2nd generation Chevrolet Corvair.
The iconic rear glass of a 1963 Chevrolet Corvette split-window coupe.
The iconic rear glass of a 1963 Chevrolet Corvette split-window coupe.
Mercedes Benz 190SL roadster.
Mercedes Benz 190SL roadster.
Early '60s Lincoln Continental convertible, the last domestically-produced 4-door car with "suicide" rear doors.
Early ’60s Lincoln Continental convertible, the last domestically-produced 4-door car with “suicide” rear doors.
A beautifully restored VW bus, lowered and wearing Porsche wheels.
A beautifully restored VW bus, lowered and wearing Porsche wheels.
The VW bus engine compartment never looked this good from the factory.
The VW bus engine compartment never looked this good from the factory.
A Packard Caribbean convertible, featuring tri-tone paint.
A Packard Caribbean convertible, featuring tri-tone paint.
The "gunsight" tail light of a 1955 Chrysler Imperial.
The “gunsight” tail light of a 1955 Chrysler Imperial.
The unique sliding door arrangement on a Kaiser Darrin (one of THREE at the show!).
The unique sliding door arrangement on a Kaiser Darrin (one of THREE at the show!).
T-Bird tails.
T-Bird tails.
A 1937 Packard convertible (owned by my friend Ron Novrit).
A 1937 Packard convertible (owned by my friend Ron Novrit).
A 1963 (first year) Studebaker Avanti. Note the round headlight bezels, found only in '63.
A 1963 (first year) Studebaker Avanti. Note the round headlight bezels, found only in ’63.
A 1959 Ford Skyliner, with the retractable hardtop in the "display" position.
A 1959 Ford Skyliner, with the retractable hardtop in the “display” position.
In the 1950s, Dodge was one of several car companies offering three different colors on one vehicle.
In the 1950s, Dodge was one of several car companies offering three different colors on one vehicle.
There was a time when a "continental kit" was an item of necessity, not of decor!
There was a time when a “continental kit” was an item of necessity, not of decor!
At one time, one could choose a luxury car like a Cadillac, or a compact car like a Metropolitan (which might fit in the Caddy's trunk).
At one time, one could choose a luxury car like a Cadillac, or a compact car like a Metropolitan (which might fit in the Caddy’s trunk).
A first-generation Mercury Capri, rarely seen in the East, as they all rusted away.
A first-generation Mercury Capri, rarely seen in the East, as they all rusted away.
A Lancia Beta Zagato.
A Lancia Beta Zagato.
A 1966 Buick Riviera.
A 1966 Buick Riviera.
A 1927 LaSalle, a GM nameplate that would not survive but a few more years.
A 1927 LaSalle, a GM nameplate that would not survive but a few more years.

All photographs copyright © 2015 Richard A. Reina. Photos may not be copied or reproduced without express written permission.

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